MINKOWSKI CONDUCTS TCHAIKOVSKY’S PATHÉTIQUE

  

A "Jupiter" and a "Pathétique" with Minkowski to show all the nuances of the Symphony Orchestra

Tickets at teatrefortuny.cat and Teatre Fortuny box office from December 2020.

Marc Minkowski, the guest conductor of our Orchestra's symphony music season, has chosen as his visiting card a programme comprising two colossal works that are known by their subtitles: the "Jupiter" and "Pathétique" symphonies. 

In the summer of 1788, Mozart wrote what were to be his last three symphonies in quick succession (No. 39, KV 543; No. 40, KV 550; and No. 41, KV 551). Disillusioned and downcast over the unsuccessful Viennese premiere of Don Giovanni and up to his neck in debt, he sought refuge in a modest house on the city outskirts.  And it was in this isolated setting that he wrote his "Jupiter" symphony, to use the nickname invented by the impresario J. P. Salomon. 

Just over a hundred years later, in 1893, Tchaikovsky composed his own last work in Saint Petersburg. “I love it as I have never loved any of my compositions," he wrote. "I am not exaggerating, my whole soul is in this symphony”. Nine days later, under the effects of a depression caused by his sexual orientation, he committed suicide. The work was his premonitory last will, a lyrical requiem for orchestra. 

Both works are musical miracles and the words we use to refer to human feelings (joy, sadness, rebellion, doubt, certitude, indifference...) are too imprecise to define them.  Marc Minkowski, the renowned French conductor who founded Les Musiciens du Louvre, will uncover for us the secrets of these two love letters to humanity. 

  • Approximate running time tbc

Artistic profile

Symphony Orchestra of the Gran Teatre del Liceu
Conductor
Marc Minkowski

With the support of the Departament de Cultura of the Catalonia Government. 

February 2021

6Saturday21:00

Information of Interest

Programme

W. A. Mozart
Symphony No. 41 in G major, KV 551, “Jupiter” 

P. I. Tchaikovsky
Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74, “Pathétique”